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  • June 2018 In close to one year, Rohingya refugees have gone from panicked people on the move to a new form of normalcy. In the camps in Bangladesh hundreds of thousands have constructed homes, mosques, bridges. Some have found jobs or created small business. The International Aid community has offered multiple services. The Kutupalong-Balukali mega-camp has the population of Vancouver or Washington DC. Seemingly chaotic at first glance, there are many sorts of order and groupings within this mass of humanity.

  • June 2018 In close to one year, Rohingya refugees have gone from panicked people on the move to a new form of normalcy. In the camps in Bangladesh hundreds of thousands have constructed homes, mosques, bridges. Some have found jobs or created small business. The International Aid community has offered multiple services. The Kutupalong-Balukali mega-camp has the population of Vancouver or Washington DC. Seemingly chaotic at first glance, there are many sorts of order and groupings within this mass of humanity.

  • June 2018 In close to one year, Rohingya refugees have gone from panicked people on the move to a new form of normalcy. In the camps in Bangladesh hundreds of thousands have constructed homes, mosques, bridges. Some have found jobs or created small business. The International Aid community has offered multiple services. The Kutupalong-Balukali mega-camp has the population of Vancouver or Washington DC. Seemingly chaotic at first glance, there are many sorts of order and groupings.

  • June 2018. a mother with her child born in a refugee camp. In close to one year, Rohingya refugees have gone from panicked people on the move to a new form of normalcy. In the camps in Bangladesh hundreds of thousands have constructed homes, mosques, bridges. Some have found jobs or created small business. The International Aid community has offered multiple services. The Kutupalong-Balukali mega-camp has the population of Vancouver or Washington DC. Seemingly chaotic at first glance, there are many sorts of order and groupings within this mass of humanity.

  • Girl with her grandmother. June 2018 In close to one year, Rohingya refugees have gone from panicked people on the move to a new form of normalcy. In the camps in Bangladesh hundreds of thousands have constructed homes, mosques, bridges. Some have found jobs or created small business. The International Aid community has offered multiple services. The Kutupalong-Balukali mega-camp has the population of Vancouver or Washington DC. Seemingly chaotic at first glance, there are many sorts of order and groupings within this mass of humanity.

  • June 2018 In close to one year, Rohingya refugees have gone from panicked people on the move to a new form of normalcy. In the camps in Bangladesh hundreds of thousands have constructed homes, mosques, bridges. Some have found jobs or created small business. The International Aid community has offered multiple services. The Kutupalong-Balukali mega-camp has the population of Vancouver or Washington DC. Seemingly chaotic at first glance, there are many sorts of order and groupings within this mass of humanity.

  • Khaleda is 16 years old. Her father appears to have been executed by the Myanmar military. Her left femur was shattered when she was shot in Myanmar in September 2017. She and her family fled to Bangladesh where she has been treated by an independent humanitarian medical organizations. She underwent surgery to repair her femur. 9 months later she is still in the recovery process. The site of the intervention is infected and she needs to travel from her shelter in Balukali camp to a nearby field hospital on a regular basis. She and her family appear to be losing hope and motivation in a true recovery. The pain from her infection prevents her from walking much, which she can only do on dry ground with crutches. Her brother or uncle carry her on the rare occasions she leaves the plastic shelter where sho now lives with her mother, brother and grandparents. Khaleda gets her femur x-rayed at the Origin Hospital in the nearby town of Court Bazar. Traveling to the hospital is a problem for them. she lies on the x-ray machine.

  • Khaleda is 16 years old. Her father appears to have been executed by the Myanmar military. Her left femur was shattered when she was shot in Myanmar in September 2017. She and her family fled to Bangladesh where she has been treated by an independent humanitarian medical organizations. She underwent surgery to repair her femur. 9 months later she is still in the recovery process. The site of the intervention is infected and she needs to travel from her shelter in Balukali camp to a nearby field hospital on a regular basis. She and her family appear to be losing hope and motivation in a true recovery. The pain from her infection prevents her from walking much, which she can only do on dry ground with crutches. Her brother or uncle carry her on the rare occasions she leaves the plastic shelter where sho now lives with her mother, brother and grandparents. Khaleda's femur x-ray is studied by family members holding it against the sky outside their shelter.

  • Kutupalong Rohingya refugees struggle through the mud during the first days of monsoon rain. The ridge seen in this photo was a road under construction. Much of the infrstructure of the camps is eroding as the rain hits. Deforestation to make space and firewood has left the sandy ground ground vulnerable in this way.

  • Kutupalong Rohingya refugees struggle through the mud during the first days of monsoon rain. The ridge seen in this photo was a road under construction. Much of the infrstructure of the camps is eroding as the rain hits. Deforestation to make space and firewood has left the sandy ground ground vulnerable in this way.

  • Rohingya refugees struggle through the the first days of monsoon rain. Much of the infrstructure of the camps is eroding as the rain hits. Deforestation to make space and firewood has left the sandy ground ground vulnerable in this way.

  • For some, the arrival of the monsoon is a blessed relief from the scorching heat.

  • Rohingya refugees struggle through the mud during the first days of monsoon rain. The ridge seen in this photo was a road under construction. Much of the infrstructure of the camps is eroding as the rain hits. Deforestation to make space and firewood has left the sandy ground ground vulnerable in this way.

  • For some, the arrival of the monsoon is a blessed relief from the scorching heat.

  • June 2018 In close to one year, Rohingya refugees have gone from panicked people on the move to a new form of normalcy. In the camps in Bangladesh hundreds of thousands have constructed homes, mosques, bridges. Some have found jobs or created small business. The International Aid community has offered multiple services. The Kutupalong-Balukali mega-camp has the population of Vancouver or Washington DC. Seemingly chaotic at first glance, there are many sorts of order and groupings.

  • June 2018 In close to one year, Rohingya refugees have gone from panicked people on the move to a new form of normalcy. In the camps in Bangladesh hundreds of thousands have constructed homes, mosques, bridges. Some have found jobs or created small business. The International Aid community has offered multiple services. The Kutupalong-Balukali mega-camp has the population of Vancouver or Washington DC. Seemingly chaotic at first glance, there are many sorts of order and groupings.

  • June 2018 In close to one year, Rohingya refugees have gone from panicked people on the move to a new form of normalcy. In the camps in Bangladesh hundreds of thousands have constructed homes, mosques, bridges. Some have found jobs or created small business. The International Aid community has offered multiple services. The Kutupalong-Balukali mega-camp has the population of Vancouver or Washington DC. Seemingly chaotic at first glance, there are many sorts of order and groupings within this mass of humanity.

  • June 2018 In close to one year, Rohingya refugees have gone from panicked people on the move to a new form of normalcy. In the camps in Bangladesh hundreds of thousands have constructed homes, mosques, bridges. Some have found jobs or created small business. The International Aid community has offered multiple services. The Kutupalong-Balukali mega-camp has the population of Vancouver or Washington DC. Seemingly chaotic at first glance, there are many sorts of order and groupings within this mass of humanity.

  • June 2018 In close to one year, Rohingya refugees have gone from panicked people on the move to a new form of normalcy. In the camps in Bangladesh hundreds of thousands have constructed homes, mosques, bridges. Some have found jobs or created small business. The International Aid community has offered multiple services. The Kutupalong-Balukali mega-camp has the population of Vancouver or Washington DC. Seemingly chaotic at first glance, there are many sorts of order and groupings.

  • June 2018. a mother with her child born in a refugee camp. In close to one year, Rohingya refugees have gone from panicked people on the move to a new form of normalcy. In the camps in Bangladesh hundreds of thousands have constructed homes, mosques, bridges. Some have found jobs or created small business. The International Aid community has offered multiple services. The Kutupalong-Balukali mega-camp has the population of Vancouver or Washington DC. Seemingly chaotic at first glance, there are many sorts of order and groupings within this mass of humanity.

  • Girl with her grandmother. June 2018 In close to one year, Rohingya refugees have gone from panicked people on the move to a new form of normalcy. In the camps in Bangladesh hundreds of thousands have constructed homes, mosques, bridges. Some have found jobs or created small business. The International Aid community has offered multiple services. The Kutupalong-Balukali mega-camp has the population of Vancouver or Washington DC. Seemingly chaotic at first glance, there are many sorts of order and groupings within this mass of humanity.

  • June 2018 In close to one year, Rohingya refugees have gone from panicked people on the move to a new form of normalcy. In the camps in Bangladesh hundreds of thousands have constructed homes, mosques, bridges. Some have found jobs or created small business. The International Aid community has offered multiple services. The Kutupalong-Balukali mega-camp has the population of Vancouver or Washington DC. Seemingly chaotic at first glance, there are many sorts of order and groupings within this mass of humanity.

  • Khaleda is 16 years old. Her father appears to have been executed by the Myanmar military. Her left femur was shattered when she was shot in Myanmar in September 2017. She and her family fled to Bangladesh where she has been treated by an independent humanitarian medical organizations. She underwent surgery to repair her femur. 9 months later she is still in the recovery process. The site of the intervention is infected and she needs to travel from her shelter in Balukali camp to a nearby field hospital on a regular basis. She and her family appear to be losing hope and motivation in a true recovery. The pain from her infection prevents her from walking much, which she can only do on dry ground with crutches. Her brother or uncle carry her on the rare occasions she leaves the plastic shelter where sho now lives with her mother, brother and grandparents. Khaleda gets her femur x-rayed at the Origin Hospital in the nearby town of Court Bazar. Traveling to the hospital is a problem for them. she lies on the x-ray machine.

  • Khaleda is 16 years old. Her father appears to have been executed by the Myanmar military. Her left femur was shattered when she was shot in Myanmar in September 2017. She and her family fled to Bangladesh where she has been treated by an independent humanitarian medical organizations. She underwent surgery to repair her femur. 9 months later she is still in the recovery process. The site of the intervention is infected and she needs to travel from her shelter in Balukali camp to a nearby field hospital on a regular basis. She and her family appear to be losing hope and motivation in a true recovery. The pain from her infection prevents her from walking much, which she can only do on dry ground with crutches. Her brother or uncle carry her on the rare occasions she leaves the plastic shelter where sho now lives with her mother, brother and grandparents. Khaleda's femur x-ray is studied by family members holding it against the sky outside their shelter.

  • Kutupalong Rohingya refugees struggle through the mud during the first days of monsoon rain. The ridge seen in this photo was a road under construction. Much of the infrstructure of the camps is eroding as the rain hits. Deforestation to make space and firewood has left the sandy ground ground vulnerable in this way.

  • Kutupalong Rohingya refugees struggle through the mud during the first days of monsoon rain. The ridge seen in this photo was a road under construction. Much of the infrstructure of the camps is eroding as the rain hits. Deforestation to make space and firewood has left the sandy ground ground vulnerable in this way.

  • Rohingya refugees struggle through the the first days of monsoon rain. Much of the infrstructure of the camps is eroding as the rain hits. Deforestation to make space and firewood has left the sandy ground ground vulnerable in this way.

  • For some, the arrival of the monsoon is a blessed relief from the scorching heat.

  • Rohingya refugees struggle through the mud during the first days of monsoon rain. The ridge seen in this photo was a road under construction. Much of the infrstructure of the camps is eroding as the rain hits. Deforestation to make space and firewood has left the sandy ground ground vulnerable in this way.

  • For some, the arrival of the monsoon is a blessed relief from the scorching heat.

  • June 2018 In close to one year, Rohingya refugees have gone from panicked people on the move to a new form of normalcy. In the camps in Bangladesh hundreds of thousands have constructed homes, mosques, bridges. Some have found jobs or created small business. The International Aid community has offered multiple services. The Kutupalong-Balukali mega-camp has the population of Vancouver or Washington DC. Seemingly chaotic at first glance, there are many sorts of order and groupings.

  • June 2018 In close to one year, Rohingya refugees have gone from panicked people on the move to a new form of normalcy. In the camps in Bangladesh hundreds of thousands have constructed homes, mosques, bridges. Some have found jobs or created small business. The International Aid community has offered multiple services. The Kutupalong-Balukali mega-camp has the population of Vancouver or Washington DC. Seemingly chaotic at first glance, there are many sorts of order and groupings.

The Rohingya have been described as the most oppressed people in the world today. These photographs were taken in October and early Nov. 2017, in the Cox's Bazar district of Bangladesh. To date, more than 700,000 Rohingya have fled persecution in Myanmar, seeking refuge in neighbouring Bangladesh.